How to measure typographic accessibility

Fontsmith: The illustrations use one of our most accessible typefaces FS Me which was researched and developed with charity Mencap and designed specifically to improve legibility for people with learning disabilities.

See also

Use your words

How to measure typographic accessibility

“Accessibility in typography is not an exact science and there is no such thing as either accessible or not. It is better to imagine a sliding scale where certain speciality typefaces are highly accessible at one end and some eg. script or display fonts are very inaccessible at the other end. Most fonts lie somewhere in the middle.” — Fontsmith


No More Tofu

Google Noto Fonts

When text is rendered by a computer, sometimes characters are displayed as “tofu”. They are little boxes to indicate your device doesn’t have a font to display the text.

Google has been developing a font family called Noto, which aims to support all languages with a harmonious look and feel. Noto is Google’s answer to tofu. The name noto is to convey the idea that Google’s goal is to see “no more tofu”. Noto has multiple styles and weights, and is freely available to all.

Monotype: Creating Noto for Google

Monotype: A typeface five years in the making, Google Noto spans more than 100 writing systems, 800 languages, and hundreds of thousands of characters. A collaborative effort between Google and Monotype, the Noto typeface is a truly universal method of communication for billions of people around the world accessing digital content.

Malayalam and Devanagari in-use on Android devices

Above: Malayalam and Devanagari in-use on Android devices

TechCrunch: To be sure, there was a degree of skepticism when Google and Monotype embarked on this project, in my opinion well summed up in the words of Pakistani-American writer Ali Eteraz (quoted by NPR in 2014, when the project was already well underway):

“I tend to go back and forth. Is it sort of a benign — possibly even helpful — universalism that Google is bringing to the table? Or is it something like technological imperialism?”

Noto color emoji

Noto includes Android’s blobby emoji

See also

Use your words

Google’s Noto Project: a unified font for all languages

Google has been developing a font family called Noto, which aims to support all languages with a harmonious look and feel.



I’ve posted quite a lot of Mad Max: Fury Road stuff on this blog (for which I make no apologies).

  • Marketing: Mad Max Fury Road: a trailer retrospective — If there were ever that managed to deliver on the intensity and sustained visual interest of its trailers…
  • Editing: Mad Max: Center FramedBy using “Eye Trace” and “Crosshair Framing” techniques during the shooting, the editor could keep the important visual information vital in one spot… the Center of the Frame.
  • Sound design: Hearing Mad Max: Fury RoadThis film uses sound to enhance and add texture to the story in order to create an auditory post-apocalyptic world full of chaos, adrenaline, and suspense.
  • Visual effects: VFX breakdown for Mad Max: Fury Road — The incredible work of Brave New World VFX.

Fury Road VFX breakdown

Where the “comic book font” came from

Vox: So…why does all the writing in comic books look like that? Vox’s Phil Edwards looked into it and found an aesthetic shaped by comics culture, technology, and really cheap paper.

Comic book fonts

See also

  • Todd Klein’s websiteI’m best known in comics as a letterer, which I’ve been doing since 1977, working with writers like Neil Gaiman, Alan Moore, Bill Willingham and many others, and collaborating with a host of artists.
  • Comicraft & Blambot, purveyors of fine comic book fonts.

The Marvel Symphonic Universe

Every Frame a Painting is back with a new video about the use of ‘temp music’ in modern moviemaking, particularly in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Tony Zhou: Off the top of your head, could you sing the theme from Star Wars? How about James Bond? Or Harry Potter? But here’s the kicker: can you sing any theme from a Marvel film? Despite 13 films and 10 billion dollars at the box office, the Marvel Cinematic Universe lacks a distinctive musical identity or approach. So let’s try to answer the question: what is missing from Marvel music?

Hollywood Scores & Soundtracks: What Do They Sound Like? Do They Sound Like Things?? Let’s Find Out! →

Two 1/350 scale USS Enterprises

Two fantastic models by ‘ModelChili’ that are fun to compare.

Scale Enterprise models

The carrier Enterprise had a crew of about 5,500, whereas the starship Enterprise only had a crew compliment of 430. // The carrier Enterprise was commissioned in 1961, the starship Enterprise studio model was built in 1965.

Scale Enterprise models

The carrier Enterprise took about 5 months work, and included buying extra parts such as aircraft, photoetch details, aftermarket decals, photoetch figures, resin Phalanx guns. // The starship Enterprise took about 3 months work and the only extras were some 1/350 scale figures for the bridge and shuttlebay.

This is an especially nice comparison as some of the original starship Enterprise drawings by (presumably) Matt Jefferies also used the aircraft carrier to help show the scale of his design.

USS Enterprise Space Cruiser

(I have this Polar Lights 1/350 Enterprise kit myself. I’m looking forward to making it… one day! You can probably tell from this blog that I have a bit of an obsession.)

See also

Craft and creativity

Two 1/350 scale USS Enterprise models

“The carrier Enterprise is 342m long, so at this scale it comes to 1005mm. The starship Enterprise is noted as being 289m long.”


SLO: 3D Printed Camera

SLO: 3D Printed Camera

Amos Dudley made made his own 3D printed camera, with lens.
He has even made the design files available for download so you can print your own.

SLO is a single lens objective. SLO is the mechanical shutter. SLO is the speed of good design, and the feeling of capturing life with a camera you made yourself.

A 3D printed camera body could look like anything, but I decided to optimize the design for printing speed and material usage. Most of the larger parts are designed without overhangs in one orientation, so they can be printed without supports, straight off the build platform. Separating the body into modules let me prototype each component individually. The shutter and lens are modules, and can be swapped out for different designs without reprinting the entire camera.

Creating a lens with a 3D printer is a challenge – your typical FDM printer won’t cut it here. […] The result was mixed- the lenses looked transparent, but weren’t optically sharp. Surface reflections were still blurry, which is a sign that a surface still has microscopic grooves that scatter light.

There’s no adjustment for shutter speed, except for the speed the button is pressed by your finger.

Photo taken with the SLO 3D printed camera

Photo taken with the SLO 3D printed camera

See more photos taken with the SLO on Flickr, shot on Fujicolor Superia 400.

35mm is the most common film standard, and the natural choice for the SLO. It’s also the only film size that’s still relatively easy to get developed at a reasonable price. The choice of a film size informs many aspects of a camera’s design and function.

(via HN)

See also

Light-based media

SLO: 3D Printed Camera

“The design of the camera body evolved from a simplified massing of functional elements to refinements based on ergonomics and scale, as I learned more about the strength of the material.” — Amos Dudley