Zero Phone

ZeroPhone

Hackaday blog: There are several open source phones out there these days, but all of them have a downside. Hard to obtain parts, hard to solder, or difficult programming systems abound. [Arsenijs] is looking to change all that with ZeroPhone. ZeroPhone is based upon the popular Raspberry Pi Zero. The $5 price tag of the CPU module means that you can build this entire phone for around $50 USD.

Features:

  • Raspberry Pi Zero in a PCB sandwich
  • No proprietary connectors, hard-to-get parts or chips that are tricky to solder
  • All the specifications for making this phone yourself will be available
  • Python as the main language for developing apps (aiming to add other languages later)
  • UI toolkit making development quicker and easier
  • Numeric keypad, 1.3" 128×64 monochrome OLED screen (with screen header supporting other types of screens)
  • 2G modem for phone functions, can be replaced with a 3G modem
  • WiFi (using an ESP8266), HDMI and audio outputs, a free USB host port
  • GPIO expansion headers for customization
  • RGB LED and vibromotor – for notifications
  • Tons of Pi Zero-related hacks that were discovered along the way, that I'll share with you as the project goes =)

See also: Other posts tagged ‘Raspberry Pi’ & Phones for the people

Also, build a Raspberry Pi VPN Router w/ PIA →

Craft and creativity

ZeroPhone: a $50 Raspberry Pi smartphone

A Pi Zero-based open-source mobile phone that you can assemble for $50 in parts.

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Portraits of Imaginary People

A work in progress by Mike Tyka:

For a while now I’ve been experimenting with ways to use generative neural nets to make portraits.

Adding a third stage allows upressing up to 4k. However I dont have any actual training data at that resolution, meaning the network only learns to generally predict smooth edges etc, It can’t know the details of what skin pores or eyelashes look like. A super-highres database of faces would be needed here. Still for purposes of printing it’s nicer to create some interesting looking artifacts at this resolution, rather than bilinear interpolation of just pixelation.

Anyways, the goal is to make these into printable physical-world art pieces but I found in practice the resolution and detail has to be pretty high or it just doesn’t look nice printed. Like I said, it’s all work in flux and progress, more soon.

(via waxy)

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Craft and creativity

Portraits of imaginary people

Mike Tyka studied biochemistry and biotechnology at the University of Bristol and currently works at Google. He became involved in creating sculpture and art in 2009 and later co-founded ALTSpace, a shared art studio in Seattle where he started creating sculptures of protein folds.

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DermalAbyss
Shape of things to come

DermalAbyss: Colour changing tattoos that monitor your health

DermalAbyss: Possibilities of Biosensors as a Tattooed Interface

MIT Media Lab researcher Katia Vega: The Dermal Abyss presents a novel approach to biointerfaces in which the body surface is rendered an interactive display. Traditional tattoo inks were replaced with biosensors whose colors change in response to variations in the interstitial fluid. It blends advances in biotechnology with traditional methods in tattoo artistry.

We developed four biosensors, reacting to three biochemical information in body fluid and changes colors: The pH sensor changes between purple and pink, the glucose sensor shifts between blue and brown; the sodium and a second pH sensor fluoresce at a higher intensity under UV light.

Researchers at MIT Media Lab and Harvard Medical School teamed up to create tattoo ink that reacts to your body’s chemistry.

DermalAbyss

Co.Design: Researchers are getting closer to turning the skin into an interface, while designers imagine what these interfaces might look like. Do they come in the form of a tattoo, like Vega suggests, or a temporary tattoo that doubles as a circuit? Do they act like a second skin? Will we use them to control our devices, or to better understand our bodies? Either way, there’s a whole lot more to explore on the surface of our skin.

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Standard

Block Bills

Block Bills – 64 banknotes generated from the Bitcoin Blockchain

Creative Applications Network: Created by Matthias Dörfelt, ‘Block Bills’ is a series of 64 banknotes generated from the Bitcoin Blockchain. Each banknote represents one block in the chain and the whole series consist of 64 consecutive blocks starting at block #456476.

Block Bills

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Shape of things to come

Block Bills – 64 banknotes generated from the Bitcoin Blockchain

Matthias Dörfelt (1987, Hamburg, Germany) is a Los Angeles-based artist. He mainly works in software producing artifacts ranging from drawings, prints, animation, videos and interactive installations to robotics. In his works he often trades control in favor of surprise because he strongly believes in computation as an expressive, playful and humorous tool.

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BBC Stories: This invention helped me write again

When Emma Lawton was 29 she was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease.
As a graphic designer, drawing is a huge part of her life but over the past three years the tremor in her hands has grown more pronounced stopping her from writing and drawing straight lines.
Enter Haiyan Zhang and her invention that is changing Emma’s life.

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