An incredible-looking game from Studio Koba, coming to Kickstarter soon!

Narita Boy

You are Narita Boy, a legendary digital hero in an epic quest through simultaneous dimensions. The digital kingdom is under attack and you are called as their last hope of survival. Explore a vast world to find the techno sword, the only effective weapon against the threat.

The aesthetic of the game is inspired by retro pixel adventures (Castlevania, Another World, Double Dragon) with a modern touch (Superbrothers, Sword and Sorcery) and an 80s plot homage (Ready Player One, He-Man, The Last Starfighter), accompanied by the retro synth touch of the old glory days.

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Tears in the Rain

In a dystopian Los Angeles future, retirement engineer John Kampff hunts down suspected Replicant Andy Smith. As John soon learns, Replicant detection is nearly impossible without specialist equipment.

Tears in the Rain poster Christopher Grant Harvey: Making Tears In the Rain has been an arduous five-year journey. I had no idea what I was in for when I set out in 2012. A few years into the project I wanted to give up, I came very close, in fact, I gave up multiple times. I asked myself why this particular film was so important. At every stage, over the five year period, I sat with the project looming large and heavy over my shoulders. I would dedicate whole weekends in pursuit of perfection and wake up on Monday mornings only to be greeted by what I felt to be mediocrity. That said, there was a burning desire to succeed dwelling deep inside that didn’t entirely burn out.

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Slice of Life logo

“Slice Of Life” is an original short Science Fiction film set in the Blade Runner universe.

While I’m not convinced that this will be a succesful a tonal match for Blade Runner, it has certainly nailed that 80s dystopian look. Most interestingly, this film is being made using old-school special effects techniques, like miniatures, matte paintings and rear projections.

For the huge advertising billboards we wanted to use rear projections. In a way because that’s how it was done in the 80’s, but also because if you film something with a camera it’s going to look much better than if it was added digitally. So we needed to design and animate a dozen of different advertisements, and then we project them on the buildings. It can’t get more analogue than that.

The Croatian filmmakers are uploading video production diaries as they go.

(via The Verge)

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‘Slice of Life’

Slice Of Life is an original short Science Fiction film set in the Blade Runner universe.

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The Best Science Fiction Cinema of the 21st Century (So Far)

Plot Point Productions: Science fiction has the freedom to ponder the big questions in a variety of dramatic contexts, both in our world or a different one. The power of the genre has always been in its capacity for escapism, but also in its promotion of a conversation about who we are and what we want from ourselves and each other.

The first fifteen years of the 21st century have seen that conversation grow and splinter in many fascinating directions. A.I., cloning, conservation and the stewardship of our planet, societal alienation, space travel, love; the best sci-fi films of this century have tackled these themes and ideas while also telling stories that are rousing, unsettling, heartbreaking…and above all, human.

David Braben
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David Braben on the science behind Elite Dangerous

David Braben is one of the most influential computer game programmers of all time thanks to his groundbreaking work with the Elite series in the 80’s. While I haven’t played the new Elite Dangerous yet, I really appreciate the thought that has gone into the designs and the respect for science that is evident.

David Braben interview, part 1 & part 2

See also: Audio design in Elite Dangerous

More parts to the David Braben interview →

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Overwatch Animated Short: “The Last Bastion”

Explore the origin story of Overwatch’s inquisitive transforming robot in our fifth animated short: The Last Bastion!

The Giant’s Dream →

Star Trek fonts
Use your words

The fonts of Star Trek

If you’ve ever tried to find the fonts used for a particular Star Trek series or film, you’ll have found that there are thousands of poor imitations on free font sites everywhere. Thanks to Yves Peters at Font Shop, now there’s a guide to the original fonts of Star Trek!

What’s interesting about Star Trek is that it has a number of typical alphabets that are immediately recognisable, and have become an integral part of pop culture. While many fan-made fonts exist based on the logos and title sequences of popular movies and television series, Star Trek is one of the very rare franchises which at one point had officially released fonts. In 1992 Bitstream introduced the Star Trek Font Pack featuring four digital typefaces – Star Trek, the signature face of the original television series; Star Trek Film, used for the credit titles of the Star Trek movies; Star Trek Pi, a collection of Star Trek insignias and Klingon symbols; and Star Trek Bold Extended, the lettering of the name and registration number on the hull of all Starfleet space ships. The Star Trek Font Pack has been discontinued long ago – possibly over licensing issues – yet individual typeface designs are still available under different names. We will run into them in this article, plus some others.

Posters for Star Trek Beyond and the first Motion Picture

In celebration of the upcoming release of Star Trek Beyond and the 50th anniversary of the franchise, Paramount had a poster created that mirrors Bob Peak’s beautiful artwork for The Motion Picture

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