BLOOMS: Strobe Animated Sculptures Invented by John Edmark

John Edmark: Blooms are 3-D printed sculptures designed to animate when spun under a strobe light. Unlike a 3D zoetrope, which animates a sequence of small changes to objects, a bloom animates as a single self-contained sculpture. The bloom’s animation effect is achieved by progressive rotations of the golden ratio, phi (ϕ), the same ratio that nature employs to generate the spiral patterns we see in pinecones and sunflowers. The rotational speed and strobe rate of the bloom are synchronized so that one flash occurs every time the bloom turns 137.5º (the angular version of phi).* Each bloom’s particular form and behavior is determined by a unique parametric seed I call a phi-nome (/fī nōm/).

(via @5tu)

See also

  • Instructables: How to make these phi-based strobe animated sculptures, by John Edmark — “This instructable demonstrates and explains blooms, a unique type of sculpture I invented that animates when spun while lit by a strobe light (or captured by a video camera with a very fast shutter speed). Unlike a traditional 3D zoetrope, which is essentially a flip book of multiple objects, a bloom is a single coherent sculpture whose ability to be animated is intrinsic to its geometry.”
  • SLO: 3D Printed Camera — Amos Dudley made made his own 3D printed camera, with lens. He has even made the design files available for download so you can print your own.
  • Still File: Real recreations of computer renderings — …a series of 4 photographs recreating computer renderings as physical scenes.

Still File

…is a series of 4 photographs recreating computer renderings as physical scenes by Skrekkøgle, a product and digital design studio in Oslo.

Cube, sphere and cone geometry with material textures mahogany, clear glass and white marble. Placed on reflective checkers plane.

Floating colored cube without environment. Low greyscale resolution creates gradient banding in background.

Three white Utah teapots – scaled, rotated, intersected and distorted. Diffuse lighting, composed on matte yellow plane.

Patterned spheres with pink metallic texture. Panoramic photo of a beach added on cylindrical environment, mirrored in both the base plane and in the metal spheres.

See also: Other posts tagged ‘3D’ and ‘CGI’.

Light-based media

Still File: Real recreations of computer renderings

The photos’ artifacts, surroundings, camera settings and lighting has been shaped intending to resemble 3d graphics of different types.

Gallery

Beautiful Wooden Lego

Fubiz: French designer Baptiste Tavitian (aka BTmanufacture) made these gorgeous wooden sculptures of Lego ‘minifigs’ and bricks.

Made entirely by hand, the little figurines resemble the famous minifigs, and exist in several sizes; The largest measuring 80cm, and are manufactured in very limited edition.

See also: Lego sets are getting grayer

Craft and creativity

Beautiful wooden sculptures of Lego

“Bringing life to peculiar puppets with my own hands, I work in a small workshop with the concern of underscoring the material. A special attention to details and a touch of eccentricity are my ingredients; for I like my artisanal creations to be unique and singular.” — Baptiste Tavitian

Gallery

Cosmo Wenman: The Times reports that artists Al-badri and Nelles used a modified Microsoft Kinect scanner hidden under clothing to gather the scan data of the bust. Following the Times story, there have been several independent and exhaustive descriptions of how their scan data simply cannot have been gathered in the way Al-badri and Nelles claim. […] They correctly point out that the Kinect scanner has fundamentally low resolution and accuracy, and that even under ideal conditions, it simply cannot acquire data as detailed as what the artists have made available. The artists’ account simply cannot be true.

All of this confusion stems from bad institutional practices regarding secrecy: The Neues Museum is hoarding 3D scans that by all rights it should share with the public, and The New York Times has allowed anonymous sources into the chain of custody of the facts of its story.


The Other Nefertiti — Artists release the 3D data of Nefertiti’s head

Nefertiti 3D print

Hyperallergic: Last October, two artists entered the Neues Museum in Berlin, where they clandestinely scanned the bust of Queen Nefertiti, the state museum’s prized gem. Three months later, they released the collected 3D dataset online as a torrent, providing completely free access under public domain to the one object in the museum’s collection off-limits to photographers.

Nora Al-Badri and Jan Nikolai Nelles

Nora Al-Badri and Jan Nikolai Nelles

“The head of Nefertiti represents all the other millions of stolen and looted artifacts all over the world currently happening, for example, in Syria, Iraq, and in Egypt,” Al-Badri said.

Updated March 9, 2016 with the news that this story is likely a hoax.

See also

  • The story of “Sweetie” — How a computer-generated 10-year old girl from the Philippines caught over 1,000 pedophiles in only two months.
  • The New Aesthetic and its PoliticsA photograph of Eric Schmidt wearing a flak jacket – as he does in his Twitter avatar – is a spur to investigate the circumstances of the photograph and the self-presentation of the corporation. It was taken on a visit to Iraq in 2009, when Google promised to digitise what remains of the National Museum’s collection, raising further questions about the digitisation and subsequent ownership of cultural patrimony, and of Google’s involvement in political activity and international diplomacy through its Google Ideas think-tank, which actively supports a programme of regime change in certain parts of the world.
Shape of things to come

Artists covertly scan bust of Nefertiti; release the 3D model for free online

“The Other Nefertiti” is an artistic intervention by the two German artists Nora Al-Badri and Jan Nikolai Nelles. Al-Badri and Nelles scanned the head of Nefertiti clandestinely in the Neues Museum Berlin without permission of the Museum and they hereby announce the release of the 3D data of Nefertitis head under a Creative Commons Licence.

Gallery

The Great Wall Of Vagina

The 9 metre long polyptych consists of four hundred plaster casts of vulvas, all of them unique, arranged into ten large panels.

“This is about grabbing the attention, using humour and spectacle, and then educating people about what normal women really look like”
Jamie McCartney – Artist

McCartney set out to make this project as broad and inclusive as possible. The age range of the women is from 18 to 76. Included are mothers and daughters, identical twins, transgendered men and women as well as a woman pre and post natal and another one pre and post labiaplasty.

“It’s time our society grew up around these issues and I’m certain that art has a role to play.”

(via HuffPo: ‘The Great Wall Of Vagina’ Is, Well, A Great Wall Of Vaginas (NSFW))

Craft and creativity, Humans and other animals

The Great Wall Of Vagina

UK-based sculptor Jamie McCartney has spent the better half of a decade creating hundreds of renderings of female genitalia. In a project titled “The Great Wall of Vagina,” the artist demonstrates not only his ability to craft effective word play, but also his knack for capturing the physical diversity of labia in a 30-foot polyptych.

Gallery
Daniel Weil chess set
Craft and creativity

Chess set architecture

Designing chess pieces seems to be a little like designing typefaces. There’s a lot of variety, but in the really elegant, refined pieces it’s the subtle attention to details that makes all the difference.

There are, perhaps, stronger architectural connections.

Parthanon proportions

The heights of the pieces reflects the facade of the Parthanon

Daniel Weil has created a new design for the chess set which is making its debut at the World Chess Candidates Tournament in London.

Carrying through the Classical theme, Weil linked the eight major chess pieces to the eight columns of the façade of the Parthanon. He redrew the height of the pieces to reflect the pitch of the façade, so that the pieces before play would evoke the structure of a Classical building.

There are also ergonomic considerations. Weil developed the idea of a ‘north hold’, where the piece is held between the index finger and thumb, and a ‘south hold’, where it is cupped in the hand for more ‘theatrical disdain’.

More on designweek.co.uk.

The architectural origins of the chess set →

Standard