Enviro+ for Raspberry Pi

By Pimoroni: Monitor your world with Enviro+ for Raspberry Pi! There’s a whole bunch of fancy environmental sensors on this board, and a gorgeous little full-colour LCD to display your data. It’s the perfect way to get started with citizen science!

 

Enviro+ is an affordable alternative to environmental monitoring stations that can cost tens of thousands of pounds and, best of all, it’s small and hackable and lets you contribute your data to citizen science efforts to monitor air quality via projects like Luftdaten.

See also: Getting Started with Enviro+

Shape of things to come

The new Enviro+ environmental monitoring sensors for Raspberry Pi

The alarming drop in our air quality is something that’s really important to understand. Devices like Enviro+ allow fine-grained, detailed datasets that let us see shifts in air quality through time and across different areas of cities. The more devices that contribute data, the better quality the dataset becomes.

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Raspberry Pi retail store Cambridge

MagPi Magazine: The new store sells a wide range of Raspberry Pi boards, accessories, kits, and merchandise. More importantly, it has interactive product demonstrations and breakout areas for people to learn all about digital making with Raspberry Pi.

Gordon Hollingworth, Director of Software Engineering at Raspberry Pi: “The concept is about trying to get closer to a less connected demographic, people who aren’t involved with technology, and show them that coding isn’t an inexplicable dark science reserved only for a few. Instead show them that it is possible, with the right instructions and an inquisitive nature, to learn about computers and coding.”

The Raspberry Pi store has been gestating for “over six years,” says Gordon. But each year Gordon and Eben Upton, Raspberry Pi CEO and co-founder, “decided against it.”

Things changed when Maplin closed all its stores in 2018. “With the demise of Maplin, we decided there was the possibility of recruiting just the right person to launch the store for us.”

See also: Other posts tagged ‘raspberry pi’

Craft and creativity

Raspberry Pi opens an official retail store in Cambridge

The vision of the store is to “promote and display” the capabilities of the Raspberry Pi computer and ecosystem.

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Zero Phone

ZeroPhone

Hackaday blog: There are several open source phones out there these days, but all of them have a downside. Hard to obtain parts, hard to solder, or difficult programming systems abound. [Arsenijs] is looking to change all that with ZeroPhone. ZeroPhone is based upon the popular Raspberry Pi Zero. The $5 price tag of the CPU module means that you can build this entire phone for around $50 USD.

Features:

  • Raspberry Pi Zero in a PCB sandwich
  • No proprietary connectors, hard-to-get parts or chips that are tricky to solder
  • All the specifications for making this phone yourself will be available
  • Python as the main language for developing apps (aiming to add other languages later)
  • UI toolkit making development quicker and easier
  • Numeric keypad, 1.3" 128×64 monochrome OLED screen (with screen header supporting other types of screens)
  • 2G modem for phone functions, can be replaced with a 3G modem
  • WiFi (using an ESP8266), HDMI and audio outputs, a free USB host port
  • GPIO expansion headers for customization
  • RGB LED and vibromotor – for notifications
  • Tons of Pi Zero-related hacks that were discovered along the way, that I'll share with you as the project goes =)

See also: Other posts tagged ‘Raspberry Pi’ & Phones for the people

Also, build a Raspberry Pi VPN Router w/ PIA →

Craft and creativity

ZeroPhone: a $50 Raspberry Pi smartphone

A Pi Zero-based open-source mobile phone that you can assemble for $50 in parts.

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NESPi – my Mini NES Classic Raspberry Pi games console

‘Daftmike’: It was inevitable… I have a Raspberry Pi, I have a 3D printer, I’m a huge nerd… At some point I was going to print a case for it in the shape of the old Nintendo Entertainment System.

In the end, this project turned into more of a love-letter to the NES than just printing a case. I learnt a lot of new things about Linux, 3D design, wrote my first Python program and had a blast doing it…

Raspberry Pi NES

See also: Other posts tagged ‘Raspberry Pi’

Shape of things to come

Build your own Amazon Echo with a Raspberry Pi for $60

The Next Web: Amazon’s Echo is a nifty little gadget that’s powered by the company’s Alexa voice assistant and listens for voice commands to do things like order your groceries, update you on the weather and play your favorite tunes. The only problem is, it costs a pretty penny — $180 to be precise.

Thankfully, you can build your own for about $60.

Raspberry Pi + Alexa Voice Service

Project: Raspberry Pi + Alexa Voice Service

This guide provides step-by-step instructions for obtaining the sample code, the dependencies, and the hardware you need to get the reference implementation running on your Pi.

The hardware you need

  1. Raspberry Pi 2 (Model B)Buy at Amazon
  2. Micro-USB power cable for Raspberry Pi (included with Raspberry Pi)
  3. Micro SD Card – To get started with Raspberry Pi you need an operating system. NOOBS (New Out Of the Box Software) is an easy-to-use operating system install manager for the Raspberry Pi. The simplest way to get NOOBS is to buy an SD card with NOOBS preinstalled – Raspberry Pi 8GB Preloaded (NOOBS) Micro SD Card
  4. An Ethernet cable
  5. USB 2.0 Mini Microphone – Raspberry Pi does not have a built-in microphone; to interact with Alexa you’ll need an external one to plug in – Buy at Amazon
  6. A USB Keyboard & Mouse, and an external HDMI Monitor – we also recommend having a USB keyboard and mouse as well as an HDMI monitor handy if for some reason you can’t “SSH” into your Raspberry Pi. More on “SSH” later.
  7. WiFi Wireless Adapter (Optional) Buy at Amazon

More Raspberry Pi projects

…and other posts tagged ‘Raspberry Pi’.

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Four years of Pi

This February 29th the Raspberry Pi will be four years old.

Four years. One leap year. 8 million Raspberry Pis.

Matthew Timmons-Brown

Matthew Timmons-Brown (aka The Raspberry Pi Guy): I was an 11 year old school boy when I first heard about the Raspberry Pi in 2011. It seemed pretty darn cool that I could own a personal computer for under £30. I followed the progress of this little British invention for the next 6 months, a total novice, and witnessed the launch on the 29th February 2012: the world’s affordable computer had been born.

See also: Other posts tagged ‘Raspberry Pi’

PaPiRus with optional slimline switches installed
Craft and creativity

PaPiRus: ePaper screen for Raspberry Pi

This seems like it could be the perfect screen for any number of Raspberry Pi projects. It’s a shame they don’t show any pictures of the display actually working, but Pi Supply have a good Kickstarter track record, so I wouldn’t be overly concerned.

Kickstarter: PaPiRus – the ePaper Screen HAT for your Raspberry Pi

PaPiRus is a versatile ePaper display HAT for the Raspberry Pi with screens ranging from 1.44″ to 2.7″ in size.

ePaper is a display technology that mimics the appearance of ink on paper. Unlike conventional displays, ePaper reflects light – just like ordinary paper – and is capable of holding text and images indefinitely, even without electricity.

Because of this, ePaper displays and Raspberry Pi’s are a match made in heaven as together they use a very small amount of power whilst still bringing a display to your project.

See also: Other posts tagged ‘Raspberry Pi’

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