Zero Phone

ZeroPhone

Hackaday blog: There are several open source phones out there these days, but all of them have a downside. Hard to obtain parts, hard to solder, or difficult programming systems abound. [Arsenijs] is looking to change all that with ZeroPhone. ZeroPhone is based upon the popular Raspberry Pi Zero. The $5 price tag of the CPU module means that you can build this entire phone for around $50 USD.

Features:

  • Raspberry Pi Zero in a PCB sandwich
  • No proprietary connectors, hard-to-get parts or chips that are tricky to solder
  • All the specifications for making this phone yourself will be available
  • Python as the main language for developing apps (aiming to add other languages later)
  • UI toolkit making development quicker and easier
  • Numeric keypad, 1.3" 128×64 monochrome OLED screen (with screen header supporting other types of screens)
  • 2G modem for phone functions, can be replaced with a 3G modem
  • WiFi (using an ESP8266), HDMI and audio outputs, a free USB host port
  • GPIO expansion headers for customization
  • RGB LED and vibromotor – for notifications
  • Tons of Pi Zero-related hacks that were discovered along the way, that I'll share with you as the project goes =)

See also: Other posts tagged ‘Raspberry Pi’ & Phones for the people

Also, build a Raspberry Pi VPN Router w/ PIA →

Craft and creativity

ZeroPhone: a $50 Raspberry Pi smartphone

A Pi Zero-based open-source mobile phone that you can assemble for $50 in parts.

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NESPi – my Mini NES Classic Raspberry Pi games console

‘Daftmike’: It was inevitable… I have a Raspberry Pi, I have a 3D printer, I’m a huge nerd… At some point I was going to print a case for it in the shape of the old Nintendo Entertainment System.

In the end, this project turned into more of a love-letter to the NES than just printing a case. I learnt a lot of new things about Linux, 3D design, wrote my first Python program and had a blast doing it…

Raspberry Pi NES

See also: Other posts tagged ‘Raspberry Pi’

Shape of things to come

Build your own Amazon Echo with a Raspberry Pi for $60

The Next Web: Amazon’s Echo is a nifty little gadget that’s powered by the company’s Alexa voice assistant and listens for voice commands to do things like order your groceries, update you on the weather and play your favorite tunes. The only problem is, it costs a pretty penny — $180 to be precise.

Thankfully, you can build your own for about $60.

Raspberry Pi + Alexa Voice Service

Project: Raspberry Pi + Alexa Voice Service

This guide provides step-by-step instructions for obtaining the sample code, the dependencies, and the hardware you need to get the reference implementation running on your Pi.

The hardware you need

  1. Raspberry Pi 2 (Model B)Buy at Amazon
  2. Micro-USB power cable for Raspberry Pi (included with Raspberry Pi)
  3. Micro SD Card – To get started with Raspberry Pi you need an operating system. NOOBS (New Out Of the Box Software) is an easy-to-use operating system install manager for the Raspberry Pi. The simplest way to get NOOBS is to buy an SD card with NOOBS preinstalled – Raspberry Pi 8GB Preloaded (NOOBS) Micro SD Card
  4. An Ethernet cable
  5. USB 2.0 Mini Microphone – Raspberry Pi does not have a built-in microphone; to interact with Alexa you’ll need an external one to plug in – Buy at Amazon
  6. A USB Keyboard & Mouse, and an external HDMI Monitor – we also recommend having a USB keyboard and mouse as well as an HDMI monitor handy if for some reason you can’t “SSH” into your Raspberry Pi. More on “SSH” later.
  7. WiFi Wireless Adapter (Optional) Buy at Amazon

More Raspberry Pi projects

…and other posts tagged ‘Raspberry Pi’.

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Four years of Pi

This February 29th the Raspberry Pi will be four years old.

Four years. One leap year. 8 million Raspberry Pis.

Matthew Timmons-Brown

Matthew Timmons-Brown (aka The Raspberry Pi Guy): I was an 11 year old school boy when I first heard about the Raspberry Pi in 2011. It seemed pretty darn cool that I could own a personal computer for under £30. I followed the progress of this little British invention for the next 6 months, a total novice, and witnessed the launch on the 29th February 2012: the world’s affordable computer had been born.

See also: Other posts tagged ‘Raspberry Pi’

PaPiRus with optional slimline switches installed
Craft and creativity

PaPiRus: ePaper screen for Raspberry Pi

This seems like it could be the perfect screen for any number of Raspberry Pi projects. It’s a shame they don’t show any pictures of the display actually working, but Pi Supply have a good Kickstarter track record, so I wouldn’t be overly concerned.

Kickstarter: PaPiRus – the ePaper Screen HAT for your Raspberry Pi

PaPiRus is a versatile ePaper display HAT for the Raspberry Pi with screens ranging from 1.44″ to 2.7″ in size.

ePaper is a display technology that mimics the appearance of ink on paper. Unlike conventional displays, ePaper reflects light – just like ordinary paper – and is capable of holding text and images indefinitely, even without electricity.

Because of this, ePaper displays and Raspberry Pi’s are a match made in heaven as together they use a very small amount of power whilst still bringing a display to your project.

See also: Other posts tagged ‘Raspberry Pi’

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Raspberry Pi 2
Shape of things to come

The new Raspberry Pi 2

Raspberry Pi 2 on sale now for $35, featuring a 900MHz quad-core ARM Cortex-A7 CPU (~6x performance), 1GB LPDDR2 SDRAM (2x memory) and complete compatibility with the Raspberry Pi 1.

Raspberry Pi 2 board

Because it has an ARMv7 processor, it can run the full range of ARM GNU/Linux distributions, including Snappy Ubuntu Core, as well as Microsoft Windows 10. Says Eben Upton:

“I think it’s a usable PC now. It was always the case that you could use a Raspberry Pi 1 as a PC but you had to say ‘this is a great PC in so far as it cost me 35 bucks’. We’ve removed the caveat that you had to be a bit forgiving with it. Now it’s just good.”

Compared to the Model B it has:

  • More GPIO. The GPIO header has grown to 40 pins, while retaining the same pinout for the first 26 pins as the Model A and B.
  • More USB. We now have 4 USB 2.0 ports, compared to 2 on the Model B, and better hotplug and overcurrent behaviour.
  • Micro SD. The old friction-fit SD card socket has been replaced with a much nicer push-push micro SD version.
  • Lower power consumption. By replacing linear regulators with switching ones we’ve reduced power consumption by between 0.5W and 1W.
  • Better audio. The audio circuit incorporates a dedicated low-noise power supply.
  • Neater form factor. We’ve aligned the USB connectors with the board edge, moved composite video onto the 3.5mm jack, and added four squarely-placed mounting holes.

In-depth with the Raspberry Pi 2

Make interviews Eben Upton of the Raspberry Pi foundation about the new board and all of its technical details.

Windows 10 for Raspberry Pi 2

In addition the Raspberry Pi 2-compatible version of Windows 10 will be available free of charge to makers.

See also: Other posts tagged Raspberry Pi.

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This tutorial will teach you how to create your own handheld linux terminal with built in screen, QWERTY thumb keyboard and battery. It has four passive USB ports for expansion and extra connectivity. It’s super portable and is about the size of a Nintendo DS (if slightly thicker).

(via The Next Web)

See also

Shape of things to come

Make a Raspberry Pi-powered handheld Linux terminal

“It’s basically a full handheld linux system that can do almost everything a normal sized computer can do. It’s not going to destroy any benchmark tests, so it’s best suited to command line stuff. Since this is the case, it’s actually a pretty good tool for learning the command line interface as well as basic scripting.” — n-o-d-e.net

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