The planet Jupiter. Observed November 1, 1880

The Public Domain Review: The French artist, astronomer and amateur entomologist Étienne Léopold Trouvelot is noted for the 7000 or so illustrations he created from his astronomical observations, the quality of which reached their zenith in the 15 exquisite pastel works which were published as ‘The Trouvelot Astronomical Drawings’ in 1882.

As well as his illustrations, Trouvelot also published some 50 scientific papers, and was credited with discovering “veiled spots” on the Sun in 1875.

See also

See also: Other posts on this blog tagged ‘space’.

Craft and creativity

The pastel astronomical drawings of Étienne Léopold Trouvelot (1882)

The second and rather more unfortunate legacy Trouvelot left the world was the accidental widespread introduction of the highly destructive European Gyspy moth onto North American soil. Although he reportedly notified some nearby entomologists and relevant officials no action was taken. A few decades later the species was rife. — The Public Domain Review

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Life on the Internet

‘The single most valuable document in the history of the World Wide Web’

CERN relinquishes all intellectual property to this code, both source and binary form and permission is granted for anyone to use, duplicate, modify and redistribute it.

It’s a dull sentence from a dull document. But that document marks the moment when the World Wide Web entered the public domain — a moment that was central to creating the Web as we know it today.

NPR asks: Could the Web have been patented? And how would the world have been different if it had?

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