Quietly tucked away in a few unassuming buildings in lower Manhattan, massive flows of data pulse through some of the world’s largest and most heavily guarded hubs of global internet infrastructure.

​Peter Garritano is a photographer based in New York City.

See also

  • The seven keys to the internet“It sounds like the stuff of science fiction: seven keys, held by individuals from all over the world, that together control security at the core of the web. James Ball joins a private ceremony, and finds the reality is rather closer to The Office than The Matrix.”
  • Ye olde submarine cable mapTeleGeography’s Submarine Cable Map has been updated for 2015. The latest edition depicts 299 cable systems that are currently active, under construction, or expected to be fully-funded by the end of 2015.
  • The 10 Immutable Laws of Computer Security, by Scott Culp c.2000
Life on the Internet

Peter Garritano’s photographs of Internet infrastructure in New York

“Quietly tucked away in a few unassuming buildings in lower Manhattan, massive flows of data pulse through some of the world’s largest and most heavily guarded hubs of global internet infrastructure.”

Gallery

Black MIDI songs will kill your brain and your computer

This Exists: Have you ever been listening to a normal song and thought, “I really wish this normal song had 280 million notes and took up 1.1 terabytes of data and was literally unplayable on any computer?” Of course, you’re only human. Black MIDI is the hypnotic madness you’ve been craving.

Black MIDI

Black MIDI is a sequenced MIDI file so dense with notes, it literally just appears to be jet black.

[Black MIDI] Nyan Trololol

See also

  • YouTube Poop…does YTP qualify as a “statement” of sorts? Is it a way to reclaim these pop culture symbols and create something that is truly our own? Or are they just the annoying byproduct of having video editing software and too much time on your hands?
  • Mechanical techno demonstrationMade at Lime Wharf Machines Room as part of Rhythm & Drone Research & Development residency, September 2015
  • The “millennial whoop” is taking over pop musicThe same exact whooping, melodic sequence has been showing up in a surprisingly high number of recent pop songs

More Black MIDI →

Daily papers: an artist’s crafty emojis

The Guardian: Kashia Kennedy uses a scalpel, tweezers and double-sided tape to create these tiny works, which easily fit in the palm of a hand for her #emojieveryday on Instagram.

“For some reason in 80-plus days I haven’t been able to bear the thought of skipping a day. I’d be so annoyed with myself.”


The inventor of emoji on his famous creations

The Guardian: MoMA in New York has just added the first emoji to their collection – Shigetaka Kurita explains how he designed them.

The original set of 176 emojis, acquired by MoMA

“I was part of a team that spent about two years designing the first emoji for the launch of i-mode [NTT DoCoMo’s mobile internet system] in 1999. It limited users to up to 250 characters in an email, so we thought emoji would be a quick and easy way for them to communicate. Plus using only words in such a short message could lead to misunderstandings … It’s difficult to express yourself properly in so few characters.”


[Updated: Making this a Guardian / emoji trifecta post.]

The Emojibator: how a euphemistic fruit became an actual sex toy

The idea of turning an eggplant (emoji-speak for penis) into a vibrator started out as a late-night joke. Now founder Jaime Jandler can’t make enough.

The Emojibator

“Our mission is to destigmatize masturbation and promote healthy sexuality” – one emoji-themed sex toy at a time. “We don’t think sex needs to be taken seriously all the time,” he added. “So we’ll make more unique products that are both intimate and silly.”

See also

  • That emoji does not mean what you think it means — Since emoji are designed differently across platforms, sometimes your text messages might get lost in translation.
  • 100 new emoji, by Avery Monsen — featuring: ‘A Box Which Must Never Be Opened’, ‘Three Worms Pretending To Be One Long Worm’ and ‘A Spectre Rises From A Seven Layer Fiesta Dip’.
Craft and creativity

Kashia Kennedy’s #emojieveryday & Shigetaka Kurita talks about designing the original emojis & Jaime Jandler’s ‘Emojibator’

“I don’t accept that the use of emoji is a sign that people are losing the ability to communicate with words, or that they have a limited vocabulary. And it’s not even a generational thing … People of all ages understand that a single emoji can say more about their emotions than text. Emoji have grown because they meet a need among mobile phone users.” — Shigetaka Kurita

Gallery
YouTube
Life on the Internet

How does YouTube actually work?

Nat and Lo: After making (and uploading) videos to YouTube for about a year, we finally decided to go behind the scenes of YouTube and ask the YouTube engineers how YouTube actually works.

What does YouTube do to your video after you upload it?

What actually happens when you watch a YouTube video?

See also

  • YouTube compression — Brandon from RocketJump shares the settings he uses to get the best quality and the smallest file-size video possible before uploading to YouTube.
  • YouTube: The Medium Is The MessageThe largest ingredient of online video is the awareness that every consumer is a possible creator.
  • YouTube PoopThe so-called ‘subversive remix’ is not a new phenomenon.
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Life on the Internet

US government framework for handling cyberattacks

The Verge: The White House now has a color-coded scale for cybersecurity threats

The Presidential Policy Directive on United States Cyber Incident Coordination builds on the action plan that Obama laid out earlier this year, and it’s intended to create a clear standard of when and how government agencies will handle incidents. It also comes with a new threat level scale, assigning specific colors and response levels to the danger of a hack.

Cyber Incident Severity Schema

The cyberattack severity scale is somewhat vague, but it’s supposed to make sure that the agencies involved in cybersecurity — the Department of Justice, Department of Homeland Security, and Office of the Director of National Intelligence — respond to threats with the same level of urgency and investment.

See also

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Vox: The GIF was invented in 1989. And since its beginning, the GIF has been used to make money. At first, GIFs were sold as placeholders for the web of the ’90s and early 2000s. But after web design became informed by professional standards, gifs lost their role as placeholders. Eventually they became tools of expression, turning snippets of video from popular culture into bite size communication devices. Today, a few big tech companies are trying to capitalize on this new use of GIFs, partnering with brands who want their content to be used as communication.

qxmmJD

See also

How To Speak On The Internet (MMM™)

Satchell Drakes: After spending quite a few years on Twitter, I’ve had my fair share of getting pulled into toxic moments. I’ve also made some of my closest friends on there. I wanted to put together a resource that might help people share their worldview in a manner that is effective and conscious of their context. Mike McHargue of The Liturgists Podcast essentially did all of the work and tackled this issue the best with a matrix of four questions to help with just that. Here’s essentially an overdramatic Retweet of that matrix.

Mike's Motive Matrix

See also