The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights by Zen Pencils, a website where inspirational quotes from famous people are adapted into cartoons by Gavin Aung Than.

another beautiful story: In our latest episode, we speak to Melbourne based cartoonist Gavin Aung Than of Zen Pencils. “A lot of people think I’m just living an exciting life, thinking of ideas and drawing, but being a cartoonist is a lot of hard work”. And while it may be hard work for Gavin to continually push out good quality comics, the cartoonist reveals in this video why his readers feedback, has in-turn made him find his calling.

Progression and regression

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

“I quit my job without any grand plan, it was a big risk and one of the scariest things I have ever done.” – Gavin Aung Than

Gallery

Tetris, by Box Brown

Tetris: The Games People Play, by Box Brown

Alexey Pajitnov had big ideas about games. In 1984, he created Tetris in his spare time while developing software for the Soviet government. Once Tetris emerged from behind the Iron Curtain, it was an instant hit. Nintendo, Atari, Sega—game developers big and small all wanted Tetris. A bidding war was sparked, followed by clandestine trips to Moscow, backroom deals, innumerable miscommunications, and outright theft.

In this graphic novel,New York Times–bestselling author Box Brown untangles this complex history and delves deep into the role games play in art, culture, and commerce. For the first time and in unparalleled detail, Tetris: The Games People Play tells the true story of the world’s most popular video game.

See also

Craft and creativity

The true story of the world’s most popular video game: Tetris

This is a lovely book too. Mine came with a bookmark and numbered print.

Gallery

Where the “comic book font” came from

Vox: So…why does all the writing in comic books look like that? Vox’s Phil Edwards looked into it and found an aesthetic shaped by comics culture, technology, and really cheap paper.

Comic book fonts

See also

  • Todd Klein’s websiteI’m best known in comics as a letterer, which I’ve been doing since 1977, working with writers like Neil Gaiman, Alan Moore, Bill Willingham and many others, and collaborating with a host of artists.
  • Comicraft & Blambot, purveyors of fine comic book fonts.

The Other Side

Three theories of how liberals and conservatives think, compiled by Nicky Case.

I’m posting this in large part because I like the format. It’s more interesting than just a text screenshot or tweetstorm when posted on social media, and it looks good in a blog post. I also appreciate that it’s explicitly public domain to encourage sharing.

It’s not a proper infographic, it’s not an essay and it’s certainly not a comic, but it is a little of all of these things.

See also: other posts tagged ‘politics’.

Humans and other animals

The psychology of liberals and conservatives

“Studies of identical twins have confirmed what we know deep down — it’s not Nurture vs Nature, it’s nurture AND nature.”

Gallery

App Review Guidelines -- The Comic Book

App Review Guidelines: The Comic Book

[PDF on the Apple.com developer site]

(via The Loop)


I’m really not sure what the point of this is. The art is excellent, but it’s making zero use of the comic medium to make the guidelines any more accessible. It’s the exact same legalese, with pictures.

Compare/contrast with Scott McCloud’s excellent comic book introduction to the new Google Chrome browser:

The Chrome comic explains why the engineers made certain choices, how these benefit users, and demonstrates important concepts visually. While the Apple comic has a very different subject matter, it still completely fails to use the medium to show rather than tell.


Update: I mentioned this on Twitter, and Scott McCloud himself responded…

I remember hearing about that project, but it had slipped my mind.

iTunes Terms and Conditions: The Graphic Novel

The complete, unabridged legal agreement, as drawn by R. Sikoryak.

See also

Shape of things to come

iOS App Review Guidelines: The Comic Book!

Using sequential art to make complex legal terms and conditions more accessible… or not.

Gallery

Continue reading on The Nib

(via Matt Bors)

Humans and other animals

Lighten Up – the subtle racism of shifting skin tones in comics

“I’m always sensitive about bringing up this sort of thing in work environments. The mere mention of race puts white people on edge, and that puts everybody else on edge.” –Ronald Wimberly

Gallery