Skyline Chess NYC

Skyline Chess — New York City Edition

Following the success of the London edition, we are delighted to present the next skyline in our range – New York City.

We are funding on Kickstarter to allow us to complete our first production run of sets and packaging – this will allow us to produce the full 32 piece chess set, complete with presentation box and folding board. Each set contains an information sheet with details on each building and how to set up the board.

We’ve chosen a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.

We gave careful consideration to selecting each piece on the board, to ensure that it both visually reflected the appropriate chess piece and also reflected the architectural status and scale of that building in the city.

(via ARCHatlas)

See also

  • Skyline Chess – New York City Edition on Kickstarter
  • Beautiful and unusual chess setsSome designs, as with the Communist Propaganda set, arose from ideology. Some were born out of wealth, such as the opulent rock crystal and silver set from 16th-century France. And some were made from necessity, such as the cardboard pieces created during the 900-day siege of Leningrad in World War II.
  • Chess set architectureAs chess increased in popularity across Europe in the 1800s, the proliferation in the variety of chess sets caused confusion amongst competitors, especially those hailing from different countries.
  • Architectural playing cards — designs by Italian architect Federico Babina.
Craft and creativity

Skyline Chess: New York City Edition

Skyline Chess is a company founded by two London based architects, Chris and Ian. We take iconic architecture from around the world and reimagine it as pieces on a chessboard, allowing you to play with your favourite cities and pit them against each other.

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Shad
Miscellany

How realistic are the fantasy castles from films and games?

Shad M Brooks is a huge, huge fan of swords and castles, amongst other geeky subjects, all of which he enthusiastically explores on his YouTube channel, Shadversity. I’ve been really enjoying his castles playlist.

Skyhold from Dragons Age Inquisition apparently gets quite a lot right…

However, he’s less complimentary about the ‘castles’ of Skyrim, which get some basics right but completely fall apart when you look at the details…

There’s some praise for The Lord of the Rings, but also a lot about the castles that doesn’t make sense…

It’s worth starting at the beginning of the playlist with the first two videos on fantasy vs. reality and the names and terms of a medieval castle parts.

Honor Guard castle

In those videos Shad shows off and explains his own rather cool design for a more realistic fantasy castle he calls ‘Honor Guard’.

See also

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Great Pyramid of Cholula
Humans and other animals

The Great Pyramid of Cholula

BBC: For an obscure temple no one’s heard of, Cholula holds an impressive array of records: it’s the largest pyramid on the planet, with a base four times larger than the Great Pyramid at Giza and nearly twice the volume.

Great Pyramid of Cholula model

Never mind the largest pyramid – it’s the largest monument ever constructed anywhere, by any civilisation, to this day. To locals it’s aptly known as Tlachihualtepetl (“man-made mountain”). Thanks to the church on top, it’s also the oldest continuously occupied building on the continent.

In fact it’s not one pyramid at all, but a great Russian doll of a construction, consisting of no less than six, one on top of the other. It grew in stages, as successive civilisations improved on what had already been built.

“They made a conscious effort to maintain and in some cases display previous construction episodes. This is pretty novel, and shows deliberate efforts to link to the past.”
David Carballo, archaeologist

See also

  • BBC Future: The giant pyramid hidden inside a mountainThis temple at Cholula dwarfs the Great Pyramid at Giza, yet it went unnoticed by Spanish invaders. Why?
  • Wikipedia: The Great Pyramid of Cholula, also known as Tlachihualtepetl (Nahuatl for “artificial mountain”), is a huge complex located in Cholula, Puebla, Mexico. It is the largest archaeological site of a pyramid (temple) in the New World, as well as the largest pyramid known to exist in the world today.
  • Traditions like Thanksgiving aren’t naturalThey’re invented, and at the time of their invention they called to a past that’s not really there. An imagined past; a constructed authenticity that serves the purposes of the present.
  • Mummy Brown and Other Historical Colors — Korwin Briggs looks at the history of some fascinating colours with this ‘digital approximation of paint-blobs-on-paper’.
  • Primitive Technology: Making a bow and arrowI made a bow and arrows in the wild using only natural materials and primitive tools I’d made previously from scratch (as usual). The tools used were a celt stone hatchet, a stone chisel, various stone blades and fire sticks.
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Shape of things to come

Dokki1: The “citizen space” is the library of the future

Quartz: There’s hope for this new era in libraries, encapsulated in Denmark’s vast Dokki1, a mixed-used “citizen space” with meeting rooms, art installations, classrooms, performance stages, makers’ workshops, and playgrounds, in addition to the usual rows of bookshelves.

Dokki1

At 35,000 square meters, Dokki1 is the largest library in Scandinavia

“We aimed for—and have achieved—a cultural meeting place that will change people’s perceptions, not just of the harbourfront where Dokki1 is situated, but the entire city of Aarhus.”

See also

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Shape of things to come

Forte Prenestino: a place of meeting, resistance, research and projects

Forte Prenestino entrance

The entrance, after crossing the drawbridge, to Rome’s Forte Prenestino.

The cutting of the chain that locked the entry gate marked the beginning of thirty years of self-management of this space as a squat.

The biggest social centre in Europe

Abitare: Today, once you pass the drawbridge, you enter into a labyrinth-like structure with the underground and ground floors of the building alternating between multiple spaces dedicated to culture and social activities, while the upper floor is where the homes and dormitories are located.

Here, apart from numerous political and social activities, many artistic events have been organised.

Fortopia

Fortopìa book cover.

Fortopia [free PDF and ebook downloads] tells the story of Forte Prenestino. A self-published book without a sale price, edited by a self-run publisher and with graphics by Valerio Bindi, it is made up of texts and images – some previously seen and some not – that celebrate the three decades of occupation of this place of meeting, resistance, research and projects.

(via ARCHatlas)

See also

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Archicards

Architectural playing card designs by Italian architect Federico Babina.

“When I was young, I used to build a house with cards: why not use architecture to design cards?”

(via The Guardian)

See also

Craft and creativity

Architectural playing cards

“Maybe I use a building or a window… something that represents them. If you look at a simple detail of the cards you can find the architect” — Federico Babina in The Guardian

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Shanty Mega-Structures by Lekan Jeyifo.

These images juxtapose sites of privileged and much coveted real-estate throughout Lagos, Nigeria with colossal vertical settlements, representing marginalized and impoverished communities. The images consider how slums are frequently viewed as unsightly eyesores to be inevitably bull-dozed, leaving their inhabitants completely displaced.

Razing the homes and settlements of marginalized people is a practice that occurs from Chicago to Rio de Janiero, and throughout the world. So in this instance the dispossessed are given prominence and visibility albeit through a somewhat Dystopian vision that speaks to the fact that these communities often suffer from a lack of appropriate sanitation, electricity, medical services, and modern communications.

See also

Shape of things to come

Shanty mega-structures

“These images juxtapose sites of privileged and much coveted real-estate throughout Lagos, Nigeria with colossal vertical settlements, representing marginalized and impoverished communities.”

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